Sunday, January 3, 2010

Picking nits

I have spent the last two afternoons working on my sports medicine boot pattern. I'm in the refinement stage now. That is, the basic design and construction methods have been worked out. All that's left is the nit-picking.

Here is a look at my second prototype pair before I tried them on the model.
They looked pretty nifty on the desk, but I'm not delighted with the fit. The area of greatest concern is the bottom edge which looks bulky and is sitting too low on the front of Balthazar's pasterns.
So it's back to the drawing board--literally. I've trimmed the bottom edge, concentrating on the area directly below the logo. This time I really thought I'd nailed it...
But once again, I'm disappointed when I try them on the model!
And so it goes. There really is no secret to patterning other than a keen eye for detail and infinite patience. Take your time, take notes and don't get too discouraged if your first, second and third attempts fall short of your expectations. If you keep at it, you'll get there eventually--at least that's what I keep telling myself!

14 comments:

  1. Hi Jen,
    When I read you title "picking nits" the nurse in me took over and I thought you were going to say that your boys had head lice, the head lice eggs are called "nits". So the joke was on me today. I am giggling now.
    Oh, I like the Sport boots and when you are done "nit picking" I hope you will be offer some for sale in the future.
    Karen

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  2. Ha! That is really funny and I am SO glad to say that there are no real nits here! :)

    I'm glad you like the boots because you and Erin will be getting the first "good" pairs as your raffle prizes. I thought I'd have finished them by now, but the nit picking stage always takes longer than I think.

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  3. Well, you just take your time and pick all the nits you want. I am so excited to be getting a pair of the boots. I will put them to good use.
    As for the other nits, I had a patient last week with a head full, let me tell you I was itchy the rest of the day and washing my hands even more often.

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  4. I think they look good! I'm curious, what type of material do you use to make them? It seems to me like the problems with fitting tack is that the material can be a little too thick for the scale of the model. I wonder if there's a way to "scrape" the material down to make it thinner? Or somehow "tenderize" it LOL! Would that make it fit better?

    I've never made tack and I know you've got loads of experience, so you've probably tried everything already. I remember when I was a kid, though, and used to fold a piece of paper over and over and over, and afer a while it became as thin and soft as tissue paper. I always wondered if that would work for miniature tack.

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  5. Those look wonderful, Jennifer! One idea might be to glue a superthin fabric to the tabs for that "velcro" look.

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  6. I have enough green material to send you a bit if you want it!

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  7. Hey, the B seems to be at a correct scale too!

    (Of course, that was the first thing I looked at...)

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  8. I Googled pictures of the real boots and I think you have it good in your second picture. I think the mule has short pasterns and maybe the boots are on a little low? Can they be pulled higher or trimmed at the top so they are shorter from top to bottom and then pulled up higher? Try them on a LP too and see how they fit, or on a Matriarch..

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  9. I think what's bugging me is that they aren't as snug around the fetlock and pastern as I want them to be. I've been playing around with them and I've come to the unpleasant conclusion that I'm going to have to add another dart. Ok, I know that's just another little stitch or two, but these were supposed to be something that would be quick and easy to make... Sigh. It's always like this. :)

    Oh, I should mention that I would *love* a piece of your green ultrasuede. I now have black and blue that I could offer you in trade, although probably you have those.

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  10. How did you make the little B's for the logo? They are really neat!

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  11. I'd like to know how you did those Bs too.. And I'm afraid that yes, I have all the black and blue I need of this stuff. I need to make myself some new boots, the ones I have are old and shabby. I may borrow some details from your pattern if that's ok. I'll put the green stuff in the mail!

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  12. I am SO glad someone asked about those logos! You are not going to believe how easy those are to make. Since I have no computer design skillz I asked Teresa Buzzell to design a teeny tiny logo for me. She did and I printed them out on regular copy paper, cut them out and carefully glued them to the front of the boots. That's it! I bet you can't believe you didn't figure that out all by yourself! :)

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  13. For what it's worth, a real SMB has two darts that form the fetlock, and honestly? Your second photo is pretty much Exactly, and I do mean IRL exactly, like they look if you don't CRANK them TIGHT - they have to be tight-tight-tight to do what they do (which is FYI why some horsepeople don't like using them), and it's also what gives them that 'sleek' photo-op look. I don't know if the material you're using will take that kind of abuse. FYI again, once the horse's leg starts to sweat under the boot, it slips down the fetlock a little and again - looks pretty much exactly like your photo. :) Hope that helps!

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  14. Could you please tell me how you fasten them, please reply, thank

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