Saturday, April 10, 2010

I skive skiver

Please tell me I'm not the only one who does this...

13 comments:

  1. No, you are not the only one but I'm not successful while doing this. I allways cut through the leather so I need to buy me leather thats thin enough for my tack making....

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  2. There is a sweet little thing you can get at any drug store. A corn parer. It's incredibly similar to my real leather skiver and works on little pieces.
    Just like this one http://www.walmart.ca/servletimagedownload?size=1&imageid=34402

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  3. Skiver is just about the thinnest leather you can buy. I purchased a hide through the Tandy special order that was organized by several other hobbyists. The quality of the hide I got is really good, but it's not as thin as my last hide. I'm spoiled--I like my skiver to be *really* thin. So I'm skiving it. It seems like something a crazy person would do--skiving skiver--but I just keep on doing it...

    Sydney, I must be more befuddled than usual today because I don't know how that thing would work. Of course, it probably wouldn't work at all for me. I'm so used to skiving with a number 11 X-acto blade that I think I'm incapable of using anything else now.... Interesting idea, though, and I really liked the hatbands you featured on your blog today.

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    1. I've noticed that some of the thicker skiver tends to actually be better quality in terms of grain and the ability to dye, so skiving it is often a (time) sacrifice I make. Also, luckily skiver is very soft and skives easily!

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  4. Here is the leather skiver I have from tandy http://www.tandyleatherfactory.com/search/searchresults/3025-00.aspx?feature=Product_1&kw=skiver

    It does work well and is quite easy and cheap. I used to use an exacto. The exacto I found I could have uneven areas where the skiver is even and very easy to use. You just drag it across the leather and it scrapes it clean. Also with the rough side of the leather I found my old clippers that no longer do their job in the barn work well to make a base for skivving.

    I may not make model tack but I do know my leather :P
    Thanks, I do like both those hatbands. Now if I could only find a reasonable horse hair distributor I could make more to sell rather than just commissions.

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  5. *grin* I have found myself doing that on occasion ;). Stablemate stuff, afterall IS small. But ask for some samples from TWMHC on ebay. They do have three kinds of skiver now and are happy to send you a small sample of each. I keep a few different kinds of skiver on hand for a multitude of projects, but sometimes, you just gotta skive :P

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  6. I haven't done it yet but I'm going to next time, since skiver is way too massive to cover stirrups properly. I also ended up skiving a pigskin split to make "roughout" for the fenders of a barrel saddle. Skiving a split is really weird to get used to, since there's no skin to cut down to - it feels the same cutting the right depth or right through it.

    I just bought a Tandy skiver but not the super skiver. I made the Tandy lady demonstrate the super skiver and didn't like it on the thin leather, so she suggested another one, the handy skiver. It doesn't seem to be available online, but it's a straight razor blade strapped into a handle that curves it slightly, and you use it like a potato peeler. Not useful for lace but I can skive the heck out of some tooling leather now. I still prefer the exacto for lace.

    The first time I tried I couldn't skive anything bigger than a half inch without cutting through it, but it really does get better as you practice!

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  7. Aha, the one I have seems to be called a skiver/beveler online. I can skive a 2oz piece of tooling leather 2 feet across down to a perfect even 1 oz in about thirty minutes with this puppy:

    http://tiny.cc/s9rb4

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    1. Allie the link no longer works, can you please repost it so I can know what kind of Skiver you are using? Thank you.

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  8. Thank you for your tips about tools for skiving leather. I might take a look at that corn parer. In Germany I don't have access to rio rondo so I have to look for other stuff that could work. ;-)

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  9. I think Tandy Leather Factory ships overseas. I posted photos on my blog about the skiver tool. Just scroll to the bottom of the post. Allie, I agree. Best thing ever for large areas, but I find that it skives lace well for me if it's not too stiff. I use it for everything now!

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  10. @ Shanti: Rio Rondo does ship internationally :) Last time I ordered shipping (to the Netherlands) was $10,50 so it's not extremely expensive either. Except, of course, that it's way too easy to spend a whole lot of money on a Rio order :P

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