Friday, December 11, 2009

Bad performance

The comments on yesterday's post were both numerous (thank you!) and interesting. It never occurred to me to ask Linda how she planned to show her Power Steering. I just assumed he'd be set up as a jumper making a sharp turn to a fence in the jump off. After all, that's the way I would show my Whiplash if I were so inclined.

Some of you, however, had different ideas. Heather Puleo (Blackthorne Studios) sent a link to this photo which really does look like a mirror image of Whiplash.
Of course that got me thinking about a similar-but-different "bad performance" picture I took earlier this year.
So, then I had to try it out with my Whiplash. Watch out as the out of control, bridleless jumper careens around the ring with the saddle on his side!
I've seen people set up performance entries like these at live shows. They can be quite amusing and usually garner a lot of attention. However, unless it's a scene class, they really shouldn't place well. The goal of performance showing is to replicate a "winning" moment, and I think we can all agree that neither of the real horses featured in today's post won their classes!

I have a cold and and am feeling too fuzzy headed to write much today so the rest of this post will be short on words and long on pictures. These are the the other photos from the loose pony sequence and should serve as a reminder that you should always check your girth before entering the showring!







Thanks to Heather for allowing me to use her photo in this post. In addition to being a great photographer, Heather also sculpts some of the nicest hunter type braids I've ever seen. You can check them out here: http://blackthornestudios.blogspot.com/2009/12/braids.html, and look for her ads on MH$P if you would like her to braid one of your models.

16 comments:

  1. Wow, glad no one was hurt with the saddle incident and great photos! I needed those when I found out the newbie rider leasing my horse stopped tightening the girth because she was afraid of hurting the horse... :D

    ReplyDelete
  2. Marianne's favorite school horse, Chinook, used to do this terrible loud tooth grinding thing when the girth was being tightened. Marianne tightened it anyway but it was never pleasant. Guess he thought he could scare her away!

    ReplyDelete
  3. hehehe, I was offline after posting and didn't even notice the conversation I started :) I have a cutting horse I've done well on in western (cutting, barrel racing, etc), and other (bareback bronc, snake-scared native mount) but haven't ventured into english much, so I was asking partly for selfish reasons. I know of someone who uses a cutting horse resin for many classes, but is positioned differently. I will have to save images, thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I've always wanted to do a "bad performance" setup or two, just for comic relief, but they never place well. There are plenty of things that happen in the real horse world (like the pics on today's blog)that are completely realistic but not "ideal" for the event being portayed. We are setting up scenes that are supposed to be the "ideal" and many times what is realistic in real life may not be ideal, therefore it won't place well because the jusging criteria is what is "ideal". Similar to halter showing where there are plenty of horses with conformational problems that would not place in a halter class - just because it is realistic doesn't mean it's ideal. What I'm trying (badly) to say is - as showers we need to present what is "ideal" because that is what we are judged on. As much as I'd like to set up a "bad performance" scene I would shy away from it unless I knew it was being judges on criteria other than what is "ideal" for the event. I sure could have some fun though, with "bad performance" entries.....hmmmm.......

    ReplyDelete
  5. ooohh that lookd a little painful! but then again a little funny....=]
    ma friend did this a vcouple of weeks back and was still hanging onto the saddle while it was underneath the horse! she ended up just dropping off in laughter fits!

    ReplyDelete
  6. I just finished painting a power steering I recently got in a trade. I showed it in all the western classes except pleasure at the one show Ive had so far and he took reserve western. I didnt bother to do the tight turn in jumper class, there are so many other models better suited for that! I agree, horses behaving badly should only go in a scene class.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I tried a semi-rearing horse in a western pleasure class for several photo shows but it never placed.

    Anyway, hope you start feeling better soon!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Years ago, when my WP show saddle was brand new, my husband wanted to ride it once. We put it on his horse and headed out in the field. The leather tie strap stretched, the saddle slid sideways and under the horse. My husband came off, the horse was very spooked by the saddle under him. He took off, cleared two fences (one a barbed wire) and ended up back in the barnyard. The saddle survived with minimal damage and was still under warrenty so repairs were covered by Cirle Y. A very scary moment. I know everyone is gasping "barbed wire". We do not own the farm land around our mini farm and this is dairy country so there is lots of barbed wire. We have long since replace all barbed wire in the fencing we own.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Never had that happen, thankfully. But, I did have Flick stop at a fence (first and last time I tried showing him over fences) and his bridle came with me, over the fence!

    Thankfully, we were at school barn, where he had been boarded before so there was no running off. He headed for the rail and stood there with this look "get me the HELL OUT OF HERE" on his face.

    I did. Given enough mental braveness, he would have been a SUPER CUTE 3' horse.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Shows in our region (Region X) don't normally have a "scene" class; "other performance" and "creative performance/creative showmanship" classes sometimes show up, but we don't tend to have a "scene" class, where these types of entries would do well. Linda, we'll have to start a movement.... too bad I've already gotten NAN approved for my show as it stands, I would have added one!

    ReplyDelete
  11. I've never had this happen to me either. I spent a lot of my formative years riding a no wither, tube bodied pony. You really couldn't girth her up tightly enough to keep the saddle in the middle. I had to learn to keep my weight centered *or else* and that lesson has served me well over the years.

    I think these pictures are funny mostly because everyone is smiling and the pony was untraumatized. In other circumstances, it could have been really scary. Karen, your story gave me the shivers!

    A lot of the performance shows around here have scene classes. I think they're a nice addition to the classlist because they allow a little more creativity. Next time I just might set up my Whiplash like that first photo. It's just such a good likeness!

    ReplyDelete
  12. I've had it happen to me. He was a round QH/draft cross who spun 180 due to the horse in front spinning from a deer. Anyhow, I stayed on for a while and then bailed when I saw a tree was going to take me out otherwise. I'd almost managed to pull the saddle back to the right position. Still, shameful; I tacked him up.

    I actually am fascinated by the lack of places to put "things gone wrong" entries too. I'm tempted to but only have tried one so far.. some judges prefer not to see it I'm learning.

    Also, thought I should mention that the cutting horse would have the saddle on the other (left) side if that's when it tipped over - centrifugal force pulling the rider off to the left. Fwiw if anyone goes to try it! :D

    ReplyDelete
  13. Glad to see you did use the picture. ;-) Always nice when photos are for than just one's own enjoyment. Lol. The twisted saddle/loose girth is actually a really amusing idea for a scene class, if I had a model horse who could pull it off, I'd defiantely do it for the lols. Thanks very much for promoting my blog and work! I am thoroughly shocked and extremely grateful! And now it's time for bed, 5am work days do me no favors.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Several years ago, Tracy and I wanted to show a horse in custom performance. Neither of us had one, except a Nazeem she'd just finished painting. So, we used him. The jumping class was him stopped in front of a jump, with the rider in a pile in the rails and the reins over his neck. It got lols, but no ribbon. I would not want it to get a ribbon in the actual jumping class, and not scene - but it was sure fun to set up! I have a photo of it around here somewhere...

    ReplyDelete
  15. Here it is!

    http://inlinethumb14.webshots.com/39245/1138504146055293638S500x500Q85.jpg

    (Side note - if anybody has seen that Nazeem and knows who owns him, will you let me know? I want him - BAD!)

    ReplyDelete
  16. Great photos and interesting performance idea. Based on all the falls I've had/seen, I think the saddle would fall the opposite direction of the horse's bend, since usually the horse goes one way and you go the other. It doesn't really affect the entry, just an observation of real falls.

    ReplyDelete