Friday, February 15, 2013

Rugby's rerun

If today's post feels like a rerun, there's a good reason.  I've documented several resin repairs on this blog, including a previous multi-leg repair on this exact model.  Although I'm not generally a fan of presenting the same information multiple times, in this case, I've decided to make an exception.  The ability to properly fix things is a godsend to a hobbyist on a budget.  Hopefully, the educational value of this post will outweigh its "been there/done that" factor! 

My Lorenz resin, Rugby, came home from his first show with a cracked tail.
The first step in this kind of repair is to remove the crack in its entirety using a dremel motor tool, an X-acto knife or a carbide scraper.
Once the crack has been eliminated, it's time to fill the gap.  This can be done with a mixture of baking soda and super glue, a two part epoxy such as Apoxie Sculpt or a combination of the two.  In this case, I used "super soda" covered with a thin layer of epoxy.  
I allowed the epoxy to cure completely, and then sanded the entire repair area with 400 grit sandpaper.  This is perhaps the most important step in creating an invisible repair, so I took my time and made sure the area was really, truly smooth before I proceeded...
to fixing the finishwork!  I dry brushed the bare resin with thin layers of acrylic paint.
Slowly but surely...
the bald spots began to fill in!
Finally, I added some pastel dust and sealer... 
and once again, Rugby is as good as new. 
I sure hope he stays fixed this time.  I'd hate to have to write yet another repair post about him!

25 comments:

  1. Reflectingstars StablesFebruary 15, 2013 at 5:55 PM

    Poor Rugby! It is terrible that you must keep fixing him. I also have a few horses that I need to take the time to touch up, thanks for the helpful hints.

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  2. Ouch,poor Boy!My fist custom took a nosedive off a fence post 5mins after I got her done,had to touch-up her nose but she was okay:)

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  3. You are truly a woman of many talents! He looks great. :)

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  4. I was really, really poor when I first started collecting resins. I couldn't afford nice pieces in mint condition, so I bought nice but broken things and learned how to fix them. It's a really good skill to have, even for someone who's not on a tight budget!

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  5. Love him! Reason I don't collect resins, I am a clutz.

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  6. Wish I could afford horses as nice as you have, poor boy! Love your horses!

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  7. Your resins are gorgeous! And that's amazing that you can make a broken or cracked one look good as new. :)

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  8. I hate it when one model always gets damaged :(

    Good thing you know how to repair him!

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  9. I love your resins, I collect Breyer have to many little hands getting into my horses that even one will not survive here someday when the budget allows and they are older maybe I'll get one, would like to hear how you can fix Breyer horses or repaint them.

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  10. Why do the resins crack like this so often? Is it improper curing of the resin during molding? Just curious because I have no idea!

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  11. Certain models are prone to breaking due to their particular sculpting. Especially tails. Resins like Depeche and Valentino are very prone to broken tails at the base.

    I have a sinclair who has a cracked tail Jennifer you've given me courage to have a go at fixing him. He has been sitting with it broken for over a year but I have a show in two weeks so the time is now! I'll let you know how I get on....

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  12. I wouldn't have the guts to cut into a resin like that- even if it was damaged! Useful to see the fixing process again though :)

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  13. I too had to learn to fix things. I can do the repairs, but some colors I just can't get right.... My Esperanza....sent her off to get a lovely new bay coat. She came home with both ears broken and is orange. I got the ears on, but haven't had the heart to get my pastels out and make the orange less, orange..... Won't use that artist again. You are much braver at repairs than I am!

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  14. Wow! Great job. How did you match the paint that easily? That is always the hardest part for me.

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  15. This post is just as informative as usual!!

    As for the repair being too much repetitive information, I'm not sure that's possible. Especially for us newer members to the hobby that may not have gotten a chance to see/read your other repair tutorials on this subject.

    P.S. This Lorenz model is AMAZING!

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  16. I have had a few resins that seem like like breaking. After I repair them (and send them to be painted because I can't do that part well) and they break again I usually get frustrated and sell them at a super discount. I am hoping I don't keep having this problem.

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  17. Hey, I'm making an english saddle and Pliver and Skiver is a HUGE difference in price. Since I'm using the pliver or skiver for covering the seat of an english saddle and probably making boots out of them later what would you suggest I use? I want to make sure that the pliver is thin but not crazy thin and what's the difference?

    Devon Comstock♥

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  18. Nice work! I have a custom who keeps breaking his tail, and I've never been brave enough to really dremel out the area around the break before hitting it with superglue and baking soda. This post may give me the courage!

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  19. It's my fault this horse keeps breaking. I left him standing perilously close to the edge of my desk and dear old Maggie knocked him over. He hit the uncarpeted floor HARD, and that's what caused all the damage. Seriously, it's amazing nothing actually broke off. Just cracks everywhere! The tail crack didn't show up right away, but I'm sure it was there all along, just lurking beneath the surface.

    Truthfully, one of the things I like best about resins is that they are so resilient and even when they do break, they're not that hard to fix.

    Like Vicky says, paint matching is the hardest part. I do my best to get close with acrylics, and then use pastels to smooth over any differences. It's much easier when the repair area is nearly black. If Rugby had been a palomino or a chestnut, this might have been a lot more difficult!

    It's also worth noting that Rugby has a customized tail that is built over a wire armature. If he hadn't, I probably would have cut the tail off in its entirety and pinned it into place (Much like you would with a broken leg).

    Anyway, that's enough blah blah from me. Hope you get your Sinclair all fixed up Lauren, and next time you need to get rid of a broken horse, Anne, be sure to think of me. I like fixing broken things.

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  20. Maybe he is so disaster-prone thanks a little in part to his name. Rugby is not exactly a gentle sport ;)

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  21. I must agree it is a great skill to have being able to fix up the horses battle scars, its generally not too hard and saves some money too haha.

    Rugby is a rather lovely horse too :)

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  22. By all means though, Rugby is a stunner!

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  23. Same problem with my on resin: Always the one to take the fall and keep breaking! Difference is, I have to pay for him to get fixed, because I'm really not that handy with that stuff!

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  24. Wow . . . gotta remember this for the horse I've got that keeps on taking brave tumbles from wherever he is. Of course his tail is skinny and weak and gets cracks every. single. time.

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  25. I'm glad Rugby's fixed! Would this technique work for legs also?

    Sarah
    CuttingHorse

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