Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Fixing Wonderscope

Travelling to and from live shows can be hard on fragile models.  I try my best to pack everything well, but occasionally this happens anyway.
There are several different ways to approach this repair, but my favorite is the soda glue method outlined by Sarah Rose on her website.  
The first step is to dab a little bit of glue on the broken ear tip.  Sprinkle a pinch of baking soda on the glue and repeat...
until the ear is just a bit longer than its unbroken counterpart.
As soon as the soda glue dries thoroughly (it doesn't take long!), it's time to start shaping the ear. 
Sarah uses a jewelers file, but I prefer to alternate between an X-acto knife and fine grit sandpaper.
As much as possible, I try to preserve the original finishwork.  However, my main concern is eliminating the seem between the old and new parts of the ear.  It's inevitable that some of the paint will be removed.
Once the repair is complete, I repaint the ear with acrylic craft paint and a dusting of pastels.  I spray it with sealer and allow to dry thoroughly.
Just like that, Wonderscope is ready to resume his showring career.
Wonderscope is a Jennifer Kroll Svelte resin painted by me in 2007.  Such a handsome boy! 
On a related note, be sure to check out Jackie Arns-Rossi's recent blog entry about a much more extensive resin restoration.  It's hard to keep a good horse down!

6 comments:

  1. Very handsome! In fact, I thought he looked rather rakish with the busted ear. But he looks nice now too ;)

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  2. He actually showed with the broken ear at the Springamathing show in May. He didn't do terribly well, but I think that had more to do with the competition than the ear. You're right, he did look pretty rakish that way!

    :)

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  3. I think he looks rather annoyed during the repair process and then happy when it's done :-) and yes, handsome!

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  4. I hate when that happens! At my first show my first resin broke his ear. :( Then he broke his tail in the mail. Poor guy, hope someone finds a use for him.

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  5. Thanks for the detailed post and the photos! I knew the general steps to take already, but seeing exactly how someone else does the superglue/baking soda is very helpful!

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