Saturday, February 27, 2016

Resin casting 101: de-molding and clean-up

In the first installment of this series, Jennifer Scott demonstrated how to prepare a rubber mold for resin casting. Part two covered mixing and pouring the liquid resin. Now--finally!--it's time to open the pot, open the mold and reveal a Rajah.

Smooth-Cast 305's seven minute pot life comes with a forty minute de-mold time. At the end of that time, the tank is de-pressurized and opened.
The mold is removed and carefully disassembled. 
 SUCCESS!
The sprues are filled with resin, which is easy to snap off. The paper thin sheet of resin next to the sprues is called "flashing." It is caused by liquid resin seeping between the two halves of the mold. Like the sprues, it's easily removed.
Three of the hooves have sprues. The fourth has a larger nub of resin created by the pour hole.
While the resin is still in the mold, Jenn uses flush wire-cutters to snip off the sprues.
The nub will be removed with the same tool after the resin has been freed.
Now it's time to carefully peel the resin from the mold.
It's important to make sure the resin has fully cured before you do this, or else the legs will warp and twist.
There's just a little bit of flashing to peel off. Otherwise, Rajah's seams are tight and straight, and his body is one hundred percent pin hole free.
Here's Rajah after just a short session with the carbide scraper. Gorgeous!
Thanks again to Jennifer Scott for allowing me to share her resin casting process. If you would like a Rajah of your own--and trust me, you do--visit Jenn's website for ordering information.

5 comments:

  1. Thank you for sharing! It's really interesting to see the process. :)

    And I so want a Rajah... he is gorgeous! <3

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  2. All the credit goes to Jenn. I truly could not have written this without her.

    And, yes, you do want a Rajah. He is amazing.

    :)

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  3. Very interesting process. Glad Jenn let you share.

    I want a Rajah too, but I have no money and no skills to trade for nice things.

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  4. What a wonderful series of articles and truly interesting to see behind the scenes into resin molding.

    Thanks Jenn for allowing Jennifer to show us this time-consuming and highly technical process! Excellent!

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  5. You're completely right... I NEED a Rajah!

    I'm imagining an adorable liver chestnut with 3 socks and a stocking....

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