Saturday, November 19, 2011

Ready to paint

My goal for this week was to completely finish Roundapony's customization and prepping, and  I am pleased to report that I have met my goal!
Although the hunter clip was the clear winner of the Hair or Bare? poll, I ended up going with the second choice blanket clip.  The hair is made from "messo" which is a mix of modeling paste and gesso.  This was my first time sculpting with messo, and I am mostly pleased with the results.  The unclipped areas are definitely textured but they're not super choppy.  
I used two of Laura Skillern's braiding tutorials to craft Roundapony's fat little dressage braids.  This was another new technique for me, and again, I'm happy with the end product.
Just for fun, here's a quick collage showing the work I've done on Roundapony to date.  He's had an eventful couple of months!
So now it's on to the paintwork, which presents a whole new series of decisions.  Mainly--what color should Roundapony be and what medium should I used to paint him?  I'm leaning towards dark bay tobiano, but perhaps just plain bay would be better?  And should I stick to pastels which I basically understand or should I try oils?  So many things to consider!

18 comments:

  1. Great custom work, Jennifer! I can't wait to see him painted.

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  2. I found the perfect color...but you probably don't want to do a pinto...Go over to the color thread on Blab, post 973 has the most adorable chunky pintaloosa. I think he is a Gypsy Cob, but Roundy would look adorable this color!!!

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  3. Great work on the hair and hair! He looks fabulous. I vote plain bay, but that's just me. If you do a tobiano, make him a nice rich dark bay.

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  4. I tried oils, they really do bring such life to the colours but I didn't like the wait time! Then I found (probably everyone was using this anyway!) Windsor & Newton Griffin Alkyd FAST DRYING OIL COLOUR!!! I don't use anything with it unless I want to do detail work in which case I use W & N Liquin Original. I also find the opaque oils work better and faster for me! It's a thought?

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  5. What don't you do, LOL. He is looking fab! I see a fat pintaloos too but that is just me :). I have some magazines from England with awesome photos of cobby ponies like him. It is the reason I buy the mags, for the ADORABLE horses!

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  6. Find a color that you can find reference photos of the clipped parts. :-) They look so different than the normal hairy parts! We'll have a few at the barn if you need 'em.

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  7. You people who think I'm capable of painting a pintaloosa crack me up! The clipped/hairy aspect of this pony is challenge enough. I really can't put a super complex pattern on top of that. That's the main reason I'm thinking bay. It's the one color I've managed to paint successfully, plus it's easier to find reference pictures of a clipped BAY horse than a clipped PINTALOOSA!

    In any event, I won't be starting him until after Thanksgiving so I have some time to sort this out. Teresa, I'd love to go to your barn for reference pix. Everything where Trillium lives is hairy.

    :)

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  8. Nice job! Bay minimal tobiano is my suggestion. :)

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  9. In Colorado, oils dry overnight.. just an FYI... :-)

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  10. I think both the hair of the unclipped blanket and his braids look AWESOME!! Great job on him... I am a bit jealous, such a nice model and you are making him very, very handsome =)

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  11. Looks great!!!!!! I would stick to pastels until you've done a few practice models with oils, plus they (oils) take about a week or more in between coats. Pastels still look rich and pretty as oils, in my opinion :D I love the braids!!

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  12. Great work. I know show cobs look like that but I do prefer your pony version.

    My friend loaned a little cobby mare who was a very minimal tobiano - basically black (you could do bay) with a white tail, 4 white legs, blaze and a spot on her neck.

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  13. If we wait a couple of weeks, you will have more options, including Flick :-) All I know that is clipped currently is the bay Andy stud.

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  14. He looks absolutely remarkable! Seems like you can do anything! I think a bay would be nice, or any colour where you can make the clipped part quite a bit lighter? Then you can really see the detail. Just a thought! Great job though :)

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  15. Jen, all I can say is WOW! He looks absolutely amazing!!! love love LOVE his fat little braids, and the unclipped texture is a great idea!! oh how I want a second casting like him to work on now!! I want to make fat little braids and hairy parts!! although of course mine would not turn out anywhere near as good as yours!! He is going to look absolutely fantastic when he is painted!!!!

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  16. He is adorable! What tool did you use to get the light hairing on his hairy parts?

    Sarah
    CuttingHorse

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    1. If memory serves correctly, I used an old, stiff, yucky, craft-type brush. There's also a good chance fingers, an X-acto knife and leather tools were involved. I tend to be an equal opportunity artist. Any tool within arm's reach is fair game.

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  17. He looks just like so many of the ponies I see every year at the local winter hunter show. We lovingly refer to it as the "fat and furry show" and it's always fun to see the creative clips some ponies get. You did a wonderful job!

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