Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Props by Ryan, part one

Laura Skillern was looking for a traditional scale pair of jump risers similar to those which nearly killed Rev and I.
She created this file and posted it on Facebook with the query: Anyone got a 3D printer?
As luck would have it, Ryan's school has a 3D printer. With the help (and blessing) of his robotics teacher, Ryan took Laura's .stl program, modified it a little and began printing. 
Three hours later, he texted me this photo. 
Here is Ryan with his first ever model horse props.
 As nice as they look in pictures, they are even more impressive in hand.
 The plastic is wonderfully sturdy...
and the grooves are perfectly, precisely symmetrical. 
This particular pair ended up a bit small. They're closer to 1:12 scale than 1:9. Despite that, I'm calling this a great first attempt.
Still, there's always room for improvement. The 3D printer is slow, and the supplies for it are somewhat pricey. Ryan and his teacher have come up with another way to create scale model jump risers. They will try it out later this week. I can hardly wait to see the results!

19 comments:

  1. Ah so awesome! I'll admit, I've been wondering how 3D printers might shake up the hobby for some time now, and I'm happy to see this proof-of-concept. ;) Which type of plastic is he using, out of curiosity?

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    1. I have no idea. It's very sturdy, though. Ryan had a long and involved story about hitting them with hammers and chisels. No damage.

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  2. That's awesome! Next year my new school has a 3D printer so I'm excited to what horsie things come out of it. Can't wait to see these again, I love them!

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  3. I would totally buy a set! Even if pricey :)

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  4. Would love to purchase a few sets!

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  5. I would love some of these!! Aren't there also online sites where you can send your 3D design and they send you the product?

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  6. Jennifer, how were you nearly hurt with this jump? Are the risers unstable? Unsafe? This seems like an excellent project to do as a fundraiser for Ryan's school. I'd like to order several sets, too! I'll watch for ordering instructions:)) Well done!

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    1. My horse didn't jump very well (or at all) and we ended up on the ground with him on top of me and my collarbone in five pieces. Not my best day.

      Also, not an equipment problem, but every I see those risers that's what I think of!

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  7. Go Ryan (and 3D printer!)

    You know, Jennifer, I show classics and will buy these off you if you want to sell *wriggles eyebrows*

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    1. I don't think I could bring myself to part with them. They are SO cool and also kind of sentimental since they represent Ryan's first ever interest in the model horse hobby.

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    2. Fair enough! They do have a nice sentimental aspect for you as you say. :)

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  8. Go Ryan! Those are so cool. How to you create a file the printer can rest as dimensional?

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    1. I don't know what Laura used to create the original file. Ryan used a program called SolidWorks to tweak it.

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  9. those are great! and very cool that Ryan got into it too

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  10. They are AWESOME!! My son was on the robotics team and took PLTW engineering classes, so he got to play with our HS's 3-D printer, too. Very cool! Have to admit I hadn't thought about model/hobby applications but what a perfect use!

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  11. They are beautiful! Great job Ryan!
    (Oh and if you have any spares, I'm available, hint hint-just kidding! ) ;-D

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  12. Awesome! I can't wait til 3D printing becomes more affordable. It will do amazing things for performance showers!

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  13. Will this file be available for download?

    I tried making my own... But that didn't work out very well.
    What are the dimensions of the printed item?

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