Wednesday, April 4, 2018

This is why you always save your patterns

Last week, I made an eventing vest for one of my dolls. I was really pleased with it at first.
Then I got my brand new, custom ordered, Jana Skybova eventing pad in the mail. Those pinks do not match.
I tried to convince myself that it was okay, but the more I looked at it, the worse it got. Something had to be done, so today I went to Michaels and bought a new piece of craft foam.
I have a plastic tub in my studio that is filled with pattern pieces. It's not at all organized, but there are patterns for just about everything I've ever made. This includes things I don't necessarily plan to make again, like eventing vests.
This looks so much better. 
The first vest took me a couple hours. The second took twenty minutes. Hurry for not having to re-invent the wheel!

6 comments:

  1. One of the scariest moments of my tack making career was my well-meaning mom deciding to 'help organize' my studio table and throwing away my english saddle pattern. I totally went digging for those pieces. :D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Love the vest and saddle pad (sometimes I can English haha)!

      Delete
    2. I've told every member of my family not to throw that box away if I die. It's worth money.

      Delete
  2. Your pattern box looks just like mine! XD

    I've been meaning to make digital copies of my patterns as a back up in case something happens, or the originals get so worn out that I can't use them anymore. Not too long ago I misplaced one of my blanket patterns. I was practically in tears because those patterns are BIG and it was nowhere to be found.
    I did find it... eventually. I had put it somewhere stupid instead of where I normally do, thinking that I would remember but obviously didn't...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is on my to-do list as well. Someday maybe it will happen.

      :D

      Delete
  3. Exactly why I try to keep every pattern. I stow them in paper envelopes. I made a master index, which is about 8 pages at this point, and it refers to those envelopes. But it's nowhere complete.

    ReplyDelete